Tag Archive | Incense

The Worlds Favorite Natural Fragrances

Whether you have a love for lavender or an obsession with opium, here at ScentSationals By Ms. Carmen we have an enormous range of wonderfully natural fragrances to choose from including some the world’s favourites. Naturally sourced from locations around the world, natural fragrances are the fundamentals behind some of the most loved perfumes in today’s shops. From flowers to new-born babies, we have a huge collection of various incense products including candles, incense sticks and microwavable soft toys. The perfect treat for any of your loved ones this Christmas, give them something they will use time and time again.

Lavender

One of the most popular, if not the most popular, natural fragrance around, Lavender is a lovely and delicate scent used in areas such as medicinal, culinary and especially in perfumes. Often, associated with a feminine scent, its clean and fresh aroma is infused in many fragrance products and loved by millions around the world.

Vanilla

Only really discovered as a perfumery product in the early 1990’s, Vanilla is now a significant ingredient in popular perfumes today. Bringing back fond childhood memories of a busy kitchen and a warm home, vanilla is seen to be a very positive scent in our lives and has now been transformed into an everyday fragrance used in many different ways.

Jasmine

Believed to have a euphoric calming effect, the wonderful note of Jasmine is a beautifully delicate fragrance found in many of today’s fragrances. Thought to be an enchanting scent, Jasmine continues to be a firm favourite in households all around the world and can be found in hundreds of different varieties.

Nag Champa

Nag Champa is considered a truly spiritual fragrance and can be found in many different forms all around the world. The most notorious form of Nag Champa are incense sticks and incense cones. Due to their important mixture of pure extracts and fine scented oils, these incense products are commonly burnt during religious ceremonies such as Poojas and Aartis.

Here at ScentSationals By Ms. Carmen, we have an enormous selection of fragrances to compliment any personality and any home. From pretty floral notes to hard-hitting woody scents, you are sure to find our own personal favorite in the way that’s right for you.

How to Choose Home Fragrance for Yourself or for a Gift

The great news is that home fragrance is much easier to buy than personal fragrance because you don’t have to contend with body chemistry changing the scent as it contacts the skin. This makes giving gifts of home fragrance highly desirable and more foolproof.

There are 6 popular scent families and almost all fragrances fit into one or more of these families. We’ve cross-referenced the fragrance families with popular colognes and recommended scents for each family:

Floral~The largest, most popular fragrance family makes up more than half of all cologne sold

  • Cologne: Beautiful, Miracle, D&G Pour Femme, Joy, Pleasures, Island Michael Kors, Ungaro
  • Personality/Lifestyle Traits: Light-hearted, romantic, youthful, playful
  • Time/Season: Round the Clock, Spring/Summer to Year Round

 

Woodsy-Mossy/Chypre (sounds like SHIP-ruh)~Dry fragrance with minimal sweetness

  • Cologne: Lovely, Cashmere Mist, Pure Turquoise, Fendi for Him, Envy, Romance, Narciso Rodriguez, Prada, Green Irish Tweed, Aramis
  • Personality/Lifestyle Traits: Classicly elegant with a twist, sophisticated, unconventional, uninhibited, natural
  • Time/Season: Round the Clock, Fall/Winter

Oriental/Spicy~The heaviest of the scent families includes cloves, amber and musk

  • Cologne: Le Feu D’Issey, Escada, Gucci, Bijan, Shalimar, Obsession, Opium, Youth Dew, Princess, Paco Rabanne for Men, Joop! Homme
  • Personality/Lifestyle Traits: Sensuous, decadent, exotic, daring, independent
  • Time/Season: Evening, Fall/Winter

Citrus/Fruity~Tangy, refreshing and gender neutral—these are among the oldest known scents

  • Cologne: Happy, Burberry Brit, Acqua di Parma, D&G Light Blue, DKNY Red Delicious, Acqua Di Gio, D&G, Armani, Drakkar Noir
  • Personality/Lifestyle Traits: Creative, decisive, honorable, irresistible, tantalizing
  • Time/Season: Round the Clock, Spring/Summer

Food~Eat dessert first! Research has shown that men are particularly drawn to food scents

  • Cologne: Angel, Pink Sugar, Hanae Mori Butterfly, Chocolovers, Serendipitous, Angel Men
  • Personality/Lifestyle Traits: hedonistic, adventurous, alluring, innocent, sweet, sassy, welcoming
  • Time/Season: After Dark, Year Round

Green~Clean herbal, grassy, leafy scents

  • Cologne: Green Tea, Jess, Escape, Sung, Safari, Chanel No. 19
  • Personality/Lifestyle Traits: Energetic, sporty, outdoorsy, down to earth, fresh
  • Time/Season: Daytime, Spring/Summer

Fragrance blending notes: I often get comments from customers that they usually don’t like vanilla, but in our combination with lavender, they love it. Frequently, I get the same type of comment about lavender, fennel, coconut and ylang ylang. This is no accident, and therefore one of my favorite compliments to receive. The sweetness of vanilla knocks the sharp edge off lavender and vice versa. I did the first round of scent blending based on the principles of aromachology, but took it the next step further working with a master perfumer until the scents exactly matched my vision—mood balancing scents with wide appeal.

These fragrances are available for your room diffusers at www.scentzsogood.com

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Make your home irresistible to family and friends with scents

When we talk about “home fragrance,” we often think of kitchens, baths and living spaces that we like to keep smelling fresh. It’s important to remember that we spend the majority of our time in our workplaces (if we work outside the home) and in our bedrooms. Many of us spend time traveling for work or leisure and many spend hours commuting each week. So as we venture further afield, so must our “home” fragrance.

Fragrance adds a rich, luxurious dimension to life and is an important aspect of the spa lifestyle. Instead of just letting smells happen, it’s empowering to put a personal stamp on indoor environments by choosing fragrances that soothe the spirit, sharpen creativity or lend excitement to a time or place

In the typical home here you will find room sprays, toilet sprays and cheap fragrance dispensers. These do a really basic job of masking odours. However, they do not purify the air or ‘beautify’ it very well. In fact, many of them have a rather harsh or unpleasant smell of their own.

The more exclusive diffusers and fragrances available in the United States – clean the air in your home and, at the same time, impart a lovely fragrance to the room.

There is a range of fragrances available so you are able to choose the one which will create the precise ambience you want. Or you can choose to influence the mood you wish to be in.

We’ll start with the simplest form of home scenting – a perfumed candle.

These come in all shapes and sizes, the more refined ones in a glass container and with a very sophisticated fragrance.

Next is a simple diffuser that normally consists of a glass container filled with fragrance essence.

Rattan sticks help vaporise the scent into the air.  The top end diffusers of this type have an elegant bottle design which complements the décor of your entrance hall, living room, bathroom or toilet.  Their fragrances, too, are out of this world.

Next is a Smelly Jelly diffuser that normally consists of a glass container filled with fragrance essence beads

Next is the  popular electric room diffuser that normally consists of a decorative glass container that heats up your with fragrance essence by way of a halogen bulb

These are just a few ways that you can scent your home. Always keep in mind, the fragrance describes you.

Find your favorite , www.scentzsogood.com

Do you have a Favorite Calvin Klein Scent?

Calvin Klein has been introducing his fragrances for men and women over the years and has remained a top seller among the market of fragrances. Calvin Klein’s fragrances entice us with refreshing blends of exotic flowers, herbs, spices, and scents of the woods that create the distinct aroma of Calvin Klein’s perfumes fitting the various moods of a men and women all over the world. A favorite among many, Calvin never seems to keep us excited and in love with his perfume collections.

His collections include the Eternity perfumes that were introduced in 1988 for men and women designed with the scents of vitalizing blends of fresh flowers. Eternity is the perfect touch to inspire any day. In 1985, Obsession revitalized the senses with a refreshing blend of aromas of the orient. This collection is also recommended for invigorating your day and carries the scent of the most exotic oriental scents. Included is Obsession Night that has a smooth blend of patchouli, cardamom, leather, black suede, and the warm scent of the woods. The fragrances of Calvin Klein can bring warmth and nature into your day. The latest, Euphoria collection is a seductive and brings new meaning to the modern day idea of sexiness. The fresh blends of oriental accents carry the fragrance of a modern freshness. Ginger, sage, black basil, cedar leaf, and amber are just some of the exotic plants used to create this seductive fragrance.

Calvin Klein is dedicated to only inspiring the best of fragrances. His fragrances will always be a classic to many and bring inspiration to lives through his natural and contemporary scents. Major shops and specialty shops prize the collections of Calvin Klein. Known all over the world for his wonderful aromas, people will continue to fall in love with the wonderful fragrances created by Calvin Klein.

How to Store your Body Oils

Fragrance Oil, like other cosmetics, has a shelf life if you are not mindful of how to preserve it. But unlike most makeup, it can be hard to replace, extremely expensive, and once something happens to it, there’s no putting it back together. Because fragrance oil is so vulnerable to degradation from a number of factors, smart storage practices are important. Many distributors may cut the fragrance with an additive. No need to worry, ScentSationals believes in PURE product! Want to know how to keep your favorite fragrance oil smelling exactly as they should for as long as possible? Here’s what to do.

  • Do not transfer it to a plastic container of any kind. The glass bottle will keep your fragrance potent
  • Keep them away from temperature extremes. The best temperature is a good bit colder than a comfortable room, around 55-60 degrees. If you want the perfect conditions, try storing your fragrance in a drawer.
  • Don’t put them in your bathroom. It makes sense to put your favorite perfume on your sink, but it’s actually not a good idea. Bathrooms are hot and humid, which makes them prime areas for breaking down the fragrance’s molecules and introducing bacteria.
  • Keep your stuff in the dark. Light exposure degrades lots of molecules, including those in most fragrances. So keeping your scents somewhere with little to no light exposure is best.
  • Keep Caps on the bottles. Keep the caps on the bottles after each use so that it will not to affect the fragrance ingredients.


Which Form Of Incense Is Best and What Is The Difference?

Production is quite the opposite for direct-burning incense. In addition to producing a pleasant scent when burnt, this type of incense must burn completely to a cool white ash with a stable ember. Ideally the incense should burn slowly and evenly with no trace of the supporting core after burning. In order to obtain these desired combustion qualities, attention has to be paid to certain proportions in direct burning incense mixtures:

  • Oil content: Resinous materials such as myrrh and frankincense must not exceed the amount of dry materials in the mixture to such a degree that the incense will not smolder and burn.[ The higher the oil content relative to the dry mass, the less likely the mixture is to burn effectively. Typically the resinous or oily substances are balanced with “dry” materials such as wood, bark and leaf powders.
  • Oxidizer quantity: The amount of chemical oxidizer in gum-bound incense must be carefully proportioned. If too little, the incense will not ignite, and if too much, the incense will burn too quickly and not produce fragrant smoke.
  • Mixture density: Incense mixtures made with natural binders must not be combined with too much water in mixing, or over-compressed while being formed, which would result in either uneven air distribution or undesirable density in the mixture, causing the incense to burn unevenly, too slowly, or too quickly
  • Particulate size: The incense mixture has to be well pulverized with similarly sized particulates. Uneven and large particulates result in uneven burning and inconsistent aroma production when burned.
  • Binder: Water-soluble binders such as “makko” (抹香・末香) have to be used in the right proportion to make sure that the incense mixture does not crumble when dry but also that the binder does not take up too much of the mixture.

Some kinds of direct-burning incense are created from “incense blanks” made of unscented combustible dust immersed into any suitable kind of essential or fragrance oil. These are often sold in America by flea-market and sidewalk vendors who have developed their own styles. Such items are often known as “dipped” or “hand-dipped” incense. This form of incense requires the least skill and equipment to manufacture, since the blanks are pre-formed in China or South East Asia, then simply scented with essential oils.

Compressed forms

Incense mixtures can be extruded or pressed into shapes. Small quantities of water are combined with the fragrance and incense base mixture and kneaded into a hard dough. The incense dough is then pressed into shaped forms to create cone and smaller coiled incense, or forced through a hydraulic press for solid stick incense. The formed incense is then trimmed and slowly dried. Incense produced in this fashion has a tendency to warp or become misshapen when improperly dried, and as such must be placed in climate-controlled rooms and rotated several times through the drying process.

Cored sticks

Traditionally, the bamboo cores of cored stick incense is prepared by hand from the clums of Phyllostachys heterocycla cv. pubescens (茅竹,江南竹) since this species produces thick wood and easily burns to ashes in the incense stick. Through this process, known as “splitting the foot of the incense stick” (剖香腳), the bamboo is trimmed to length, soaked, peeled, and then continuously split in halves until thin sticks of bamboo with square cross sections of less than 3mm ]This process has been largely been replaced by machines in modern incense production.

In the case of cored incensed sticks, several methods are employed to coat the sticks cores with incense mixture:

  • Paste rolling: A wet, malleable paste of incense mixture is first rolled into a long, thin coil, using a paddle. Then, a thin stick is put next to the coil and the stick and paste are rolled together until the stick is centered in the mixture and the desired thickness is achieved. The stick is then cut to the desired length and dried.
  • Powder-coating: Powder-coating is used mainly to produce cored incense of either larger coil (up to 1 meter in diameter) or cored stick forms. A bundle of the supporting material (typically thin bamboo or sandalwood slivers) is soaked in water or a thin water/glue mixture for a short time. The thin sticks are then evenly separated, then dipped into a tray of incense powder, consisting of fragrance materials and occasionally a plant-based binder. The dry incense powder is then tossed and piled over the stick while they are spread apart. The sticks are then gently rolled and packed to maintain roundness while more incense powder is repeatedly tossed onto the sticks. Three to four layers of powder are coated onto the sticks, forming a 2 mm thick layer of incense material on the stick. The coated incense is then allowed to dry in open air. Additional coatings of incense mixture can be applied after each period of successive drying. Incense sticks that are burned in temples of Chinese folk religion produced in this fashion can have a thickness between 2 to 4 millimeters.
  • Compression: A damp powder is mechanically formed around a cored stick by compression, similar to the way uncored sticks are formed. This form is becoming more commonly found due to the higher labor cost of producing powder-coated or paste-rolled sticks.

Burning incense

For indirect-burning incense, pieces of the incense are burned by placing them directly on top of a heat source or on a hot metal plate in a censer orthurible.

In Japan a similar censer called a egōro (柄香炉?) is used by several Buddhist sects. The egōro is usually made of brass with a long handle (柄 e?)) and no chain. Instead of charcoal, makkō powder is poured into a depression made in a bed of ash. The makkō is lit and the incense mixture is burned on top. This method is known as Sonae-kō (Religious Burning).

For direct-burning incense, the tip or end of the incense is ignited with a flame or other heat source until the incense begins to turn into ash at the burning end. Flames on the incense are then fanned or blown out, with the incense continuing to burn flamelessly on its own.

Chinese incense

For over two thousand years, the Chinese have used incense (Chinese: 香; pinyin: xiāng; meaning “fragrance; aroma; perfume; spice; incense”) in religious ceremonies, ancestor veneration, Traditional Chinese medicine, and daily life.

Agarwood (沈香; chénxiāng) and sandalwood (檀香; tánxiāng) are the two most important ingredients in Chinese incense.

Along with the introduction of Buddhism in China came calibrated incense sticks and incense clocks (香鐘;xiāngzhōng; “incense clock”; or 香印; xiāngyìn; “incense seal”). The poet Yu Jianwu 庾肩吾 (487-551) first recorded them: “By burning incense we know the o’clock of the night, With graduated candles we confirm the tally of the watches.” The use of these incense timekeeping devices spread from Buddhist monasteries into Chinese secular society.

It is incorrect to assume that the Chinese only burn incense in the home before the family shrine. In Taoist traditions, incense is inextricably associated with the ‘yin’ energies of the dead, temples, shrines, and ghosts. Therefore, Taoist Chinese believe burning undedicated incense in the home attracts the dreaded hungry ghosts, who consume the smoke and ruin the fortunes of the family.

However, since Neolithic times, the Chinese have evolved using incense not only for religious ceremonies, but also for personal and environmental aromatherapy. Although misrepresented until recent studies, Chinese incense art is now regarded as one of the esteemed Chinese art forms – next to calligraphy, tea, flower arrangements, antiquities, etc.

Indian incense

An Oriental Orthodox congregation in India processes outside its church with palm fronds on Palm Sunday with incense.

Indian incense can be divided into two categories: masala and charcoal.

Masala incenses are made by blending several solid scented ingredients into a paste and then rolling that paste onto a bamboo core stick. These incenses usually contain little or no liquid scents (which can evaporate or diminish over time).

Charcoal incenses are made by dipping an unscented “blank” (non-perfume stick) into a mixture of perfumes and/or essential oils. These blanks usually contain a binding resin that holds the sticks’ ingredients together. Most charcoal incenses are black in color.

Jerusalem temple incense

Ketoret was the incense offered in the Temple in Jerusalem and is stated in the Book of Exodus as a mixture ofstacte, onycha, galbanum and frankincense.

Tibetan incense

Tibetan incense refers to a common style of incense found in Tibet, Nepal, and Bhutan. These incenses have a characteristic “earthy” scent to them. Ingredients vary from cinnamon, clove, and juniper, to kusum flower, ashvagandha, or sahi jeera.

Many Tibetan incenses are thought to have medicinal properties. Their recipes come from ancient Vedic texts that are based on even older Ayurvedicmedical texts. The recipes have remained unchanged for centuries.

Japanese incense

In Japan incense appreciation folklore includes art, culture, history, and ceremony. It can be compared to and has some of the same qualities as music, art, or literature. Incense burning may occasionally take place within the tea ceremony, just like Calligraphy, Ikebana, and Scroll Arrangement. However the art of incense appreciation or Koh-do, is generally practiced as a separate art form from the tea ceremony, however usually practiced within a tea room of traditional Zen design.

Agarwoodand sandalwood  are the two most important ingredients in Japanese incense. Agarwood is known as “Jinkō” in Japan, which translates as “incense that sinks in water”, due to the weight of the resin in the wood. Sandalwood is one of the most calming incense ingredients and lends itself well to meditation. It is also used in the Japanese tea ceremony. The most valued Sandalwood comes from Mysore in the state of Karnataka in India.

Another important ingredient in Japanese incense is kyara.  The one kind of agarwood (Japanese incense companies divide agarwood into 6 categories depending on the region obtained and properties of the agarwood). Kyara is currently worth more than its weight in gold.

Some terms used in Japanese incense culture include:

Incense Arts: 

  • Agarwood:  – from heartwood from Aquilaria trees, unique, the incense wood most used in incense ceremony, other names are: lignum aloes or aloeswood, gaharu, jinko, or oud.
  • Censer/Incense burner: – usually small and used for heating incense not burning, or larger and used for burning
  • Charcoal: – only the odorless kind is used.
  • Incense woods:– a naturally fragrant resinous wood.

What type of Incense are You Buying?

Incense materials are available in various forms and degrees of processing. They can generally be separated into “direct-burning” and “indirect-burning” types depending on use. Preference for one form or another varies with culture, tradition, and personal taste. Although the production of direct- and indirect-burning incense are both blended to produce a pleasant smell when burned, the two differ in their composition due to the former’s requirement for even, stable, and sustained burning.

Indirect-burning Incense

Indirect-burning frankincense on a hot coal

Indirect-burning incense, also called “non-combustible incense”,is a combination of aromatic ingredients that are not prepared in any particular way or encouraged into any particular form, leaving it mostly unsuitable for direct combustion. The use of this class of incense requires a separate heat source since it does not generally kindle a fire capable of burning itself and may not ignite at all under normal conditions. This incense can vary in the duration of its burning with the texture of the material. Finer ingredients tend to burn more rapidly, while coarsely ground or whole chunks may be consumed very gradually as they have less total surface area. The heat is traditionally provided by charcoal or glowing embers.

In the West, the best known incense materials of this type are frankincense and myrrh, likely due to their many mentions in the Christian Bible. In fact, the word forfrankincense in many European languages also alludes to any form of incense.

  • Whole: The incense material is burned directly in its raw unprocessed form on top of coal embers.
  • Powdered or granulated: The incense material is broken down into finer bits. This incense burns quickly and provides a short period of intense smells.
  • Paste: The powdered or granulated incense material is mixed with a sticky and incombustible binder, such as dried fruit, honey, or a soft resin and then formed to balls or small pastilles. These may then be allowed to mature in a controlled environment where the fragrances can commingle and unite. Much Arabian incense, also called “Bukhoor” or “Bakhoor”, is of this type (Bakhoor, actually refers to frankincense in both Lebanese and Arabic, and Japan has a history of kneaded incense, called nerikō or awasekō, using this method.Within the Eastern Orthodox Christian tradition, raw frankincense is ground into a fine powder and then mixed with various sweet-smelling essential oils.

Production

Indirect burning incense does not have any stringent requirements except for achieving a pleasant smell when lit. Mixture of incense materials can be joined by powdering the raw materials and then mixing them together with a binder to form pastes, which are then cut and dried into pellets.

Incense of the Athonite Orthodox Christian tradition are made using similar methods by powdering frankincense or fir resin, mixing it with essential oils. Floral fragrances are the most common, but citrus such as lemon is not uncommon. The incense mixture is then rolled out into a slab approximately 1 cm thick and left until the slab has firmed. It is then cut into small cubes, coated with clay powder to prevent adhesion, and allowed to fully harden and dry. The product visually resemble cubes of Loukoum. In Greece this rolled incense resin is called ‘Moskolibano’, and generally comes in either a pink or green colour denoting the fragrance, with pink being rose and green being jasmine.

Direct-burning Incense

Incense coils hanging from the ceiling of an East Asian temple

Direct-burning incense also called “combustible incense”, generally requires little preparation prior to its use. When lit directly by a flame (hence the appellation) and then fanned out, the glowing ember on the incense will continue to smoulder and burn away the rest of the incense without continued application of heat or flame from an outside source. This class of incense is made from a moldable substrate of fragrant finely ground (or liquid) incense materials and odourless binder.The composition must be adjusted to provide fragrance in the proper concentration and to make sure even burning. The following types of direct-burning incense are commonly encountered, though the material itself can take almost any form, according to expediency or whimsy:

  • Coil: Extruded and shaped into a coil without a core. This type of incense is able to burn for an extended period, from hours to days, and is commonly produced and used by Chinese culture
  • Cone: Incense in this form burns relatively fast. Incense cones were invented in Japan in the 1800s.
  • Cored stick: This form of stick incense has a supporting core of bamboo. Higher quality varieties of this form have fragrant sandalwood cores. The core is coated by a thick layer of incense material that burns away with the core. This type of incense is commonly produced in India and China. When used for worship in Chinese folk religion, cored incensed sticks are sometimes known as “joss sticks”.
  • Solid stick: This stick incense has no supporting core and is completely made of incense material. Easily broken into pieces, it allows one to determine the specific amount of incense they wish to burn. This is the most commonly produced form of incense in Japan and Tibet.
  • Powder: The loose incense powder used for making indirect burning incense is sometimes burned without further processing. They are typically packed into long trails on top of wood ash using a stencil and burned in special censers or incense clocks.
  • Paper: Paper infused with incense, folded accordion style, lit and blown out. Examples are Carta d’Armenia and Papier d’Arménie.
  • Rope: The incense powder is rolled into paper sheets, which are then rolled into ropes, twisted tightly, then doubled over and twisted again, yielding a two-strand rope. The larger end is the bight, and may be stood vertically, in a shallow dish of sand or pebbles. The smaller (pointed) end is lit. This type of incense is highly transportable and stays fresh for extremely long periods. It has been used for centuries in Tibet and Nepal.

Direct-burning incense of these forms is either extruded, pressed into forms, or coated onto a supporting material.

The disks of powdered mugwort called ‘moxa’ sold in Chinese shops and herbalists are used in Traditional Chinese medicine for moxibustion treatment. Moxa tablets are not incenses; the treatment relies on heat rather than fragrance.

Joss sticks

Picture of joss sticks in a Chinese temple

Joss sticks are used for a variety of purposes associated with ritual and religious devotion in China and India. They are used in Chinese influenced East Asian and Southeast Asian countries, traditionally burned before the threshold of a home or business, before an image of a Chinese popular religion divinity or spirit of place, or in small and humble or large and elaborate shrine found at the main entrance to each and every village. Here the earth god is propitiated in the hope of bringing wealth and health to the village. They can also be burned in front of a door, or open window as an offering toheaven, or devas. The Chinese word “joss” for Joss (god) is derived from the Latin deus (god) via Portuguese.

Big Dragon joss sticks.

Joss-stick burning is an everyday practice in traditional Chinese religion. There are many different types of joss sticks used for different purposes or on different festive days. Many of them are long and thin and are mostly colored yellow, red, and more rarely, black. Thick joss sticks are used for special ceremonies, such as funerals. Spiral joss sticks are also used on a regular basis, which are found hanging above temple ceilings, with burn times that are exceedingly long. In some states, such as Taiwan, Singapore, or Malaysia, where they celebrate the Ghost Festival, large, pillar-like dragon joss sticks are sometimes used. These generate such a massive amount of smoke and heat that they are only ever burned outside.

Chinese incense sticks for use in popular religion are generally without aroma or only the slightest trace of jasmine or rose, since it is the smoke, not the scent, which is important in conveying the prayers of the faithful to heaven. They are composed of the dried powdered bark of a non-scented species of Cinnamon native to Cambodia, Cinnamomum cambodianum. Inexpensive packs of 300 are often found for sale in Chinese supermarkets. Despite that they contain no sandalwood at all, they often include the Chinese character for sandalwood on the label, as a generic term for incense.

Highly scented Chinese incense sticks are only used by some Buddhists. These are often quite expensive due to the use of large amounts of sandalwood, aloeswood, or floral scents used. The Sandalwood used in Chinese incenses does not come from India, its native home, but rather from groves planted within Chinese territory. Sites such as belonging to Tzu Chi, Chung Tai Shan, Buddhism in Sri Lanka, Buddhism in Burma and Korean Buddhism do not use incense.